Artist You Should Know: Dead Leaf Echo

Get to know Brooklyn’s music/art collective, Dead Leaf Echo! We chatted with the group to get the deets on their new cassette, I WILL Do Anything Tour, influences, and more.

Hey Dead Leaf Echo, introduce yourselves.
We are LG: Guitar,Vocals Ana B.: Guitar, Vocals Kevin K: Drum Steve S: Bass

You recently premiered “sparks.fly.from.a.kiss” on IMPOSE who called it, “Badass, sensual, and intense, this track is something we intend to play at our next big party.” What’s the story behind the track?
That’s a last minute B-side that was added to the tape. It was created in the studio with a drum machine and one guitar. The lead off track “I will do (anything)” (premiered on Brooklyn Vegan) was recorded at Mexican Summer’s studio Gary’s Electrical with Jorge Elbrecht (Ariel Pink, Violens) we tracked it there almost 2 years ago! It’s nice to finally release something after such a long time.

What’s the concept behind split cassette with Did You Die?
We played this wild techno party in Vancouver with them before the van broke down in British Columbia. It was ultimately the last show of our west coast tour last year. We knew there was something special there and they had suggested we do something collectively together. We have these 2 tracks that aren’t going to be on our new album so it worked out perfectly for this tape release. Plus we’ve never released any music on that format so that’s cool.

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How to Get a Great Manager

When do you know you need a manager and how do you find one? Our Nashville-based CONNECT Manager, Daren, who works with a roster of CONNECT artists and who spent three years at Red Light Management handling day-to-day duties for 3 Doors Down, von Grey, and working collaboratively on a roster that included Lady Antebellum and Dierks Bentley, rounded up tips for how to find a great manager.

Do you want a manager? Most artists will say, “Yes, of course!”, but the question to ask is whether you really need a manager. Be honest…and usually the answer is: I don’t need a manager…yet.  The groundwork needs to be laid by you. Have you figured out who you are as an artist, what your live show is all about, and created some sense of branding? These things take time to develop and usually your fanbase develops along with this. This in turn usually attracts the attention of the music industry. We are a pretty chatty bunch and typically talk about what new acts we are into. So, without further ado:

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Music Publishing 101: 5 Things You Should Look For In A Music Publisher

So you’ve written a song. Now what? Well, by writing a song you’ve created a piece of intellectual property which you own. Copyright is there to protect the value of this property, allowing you to generate income from its usage. Music publishing is the business of protecting and administering the copyright in your song and maximizing its value. Generally, a music publishing company will take a share of the income from your song in return for the administrative and creative work they do for you. Working with a good publisher can save you time and money and plug you into a wider and more efficient network of opportunities to generate income in comparison with self-administering your songs as a performing rights organization (PRO) member only. We’ve asked Ross Adamson, Senior Catalogue Manager at CONNECT Songs' global publishing administration partner Sentric Music for 5 points you should consider when looking to work with a publisher:

Fair Deal Terms

Are the basic terms of the publishing agreement fair and in-line with what you need for the point you’re at in your music career? Is the publisher offering money (an advance) upfront? The prospect of cash now is always tempting but does the amount being offered seem fair in comparison with the length (the term) of the agreement? If no money is offered as part of the deal then the term should be extremely short – ideally less than 6 months and certainly no longer than a year under normal circumstances. (For example – the CONNECT Songs agreements offer no advance as standard and so the term is an extremely short and very fair 45 days).

What splits are being offered? Traditionally publishing splits were 50/50 but, again, this should be in line with any advance and the term. For big money investment from a publisher, you might be willing to have an initial 50/50 split on royalties with them but what about after they’ve recouped the advance? Does the rate increase in your favour? For a deal with no advance, alongside a short term you should also expect a fair royalty split – probably no less than 75/25 in your favour. (Again, using CONNECT Songs as an example – the performance and mechanical royalty split is 80/20 in favour of the songwriter).

KevinMusic Publishing 101: 5 Things You Should Look For In A Music Publisher
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