Hangout Music Fest Picks Top 10 Bands. Now It’s Your Turn!

“2012 Hang Loose Band Competition,” presented by America’s premier beachfront music festival, The Hangout Music Festis giving ten up-and-coming ReverbNation bands the chance to put their music in front of thousands of online fans! The lucky winner will get to perform at The Hangout Music Fest in the Gulf Shores, Alabama, alongside the all-star-lineup below.

These 10 bands depend on the votes of the fans! So head to Hang Loose Band Competition page, listen to their music, and click “Like” to vote for your favorite — may the best band win!

The winner will play on same stage as these bands!

KevinHangout Music Fest Picks Top 10 Bands. Now It’s Your Turn!
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Get Venues to Ask You Back: 8 Tips You Can Use For Your Next Show

In this guest post, former touring musician and CEO of Marcato Festival, Darren Gallop offers eight simple tips for building valuable relationships with live performance venue managers and staff. Darren’s learned these tips the hard way, and shares his words of wisdom to help your band maximize the potential of live shows and build support as your career grows.

It’s no secret these days that live performance can be one of the most important elements in a musician’s career for two reasons. Live performance is a key source of revenue and record sales for an artist and is critical to increasing an artist’s exposure level. For these reasons you should aim to establish the best possible relationship with performance venues and the people who manage these very important resources in your career.

The results of a positive relationship with the venues include increased opportunities, greater revenue, more flexibility and referral to other venues in other towns.

As you build your network of cities where you perform, these relationships can deliver real results. If a venue needs an opener for a high profile band coming to town, they are going to call the band they like. And by like, I mean they like their music, their personality and they’re interested in nurturning that relationship. If they don’t like you, don’t expect the call.

Here are the eight simple things that make up the secret to building a successful live performance career for your band:

1. Promote the Show

When you have a show at a venue don’t wait for them to get the word out there. Take it upon yourselves to promote the hell out of it. Send posters well in advance, set-up a Facebook event or if the venue offers to create the event, share and promote it. Tweet about it, put it on your website, reach out to press in the area. Let the venue know what you are doing and give them any updates if you get any press or if there is anything they should know that they can use for further promotion of the show. (Editor’s note: Bands and venues are using Promote It for Facebook campaigns and getting awesome results. Check it out Promote It.)

2. Send the Venue Your Music

Ask the venue how they want to have the music. Do they want a CD to play at the venue? Suggest that they do some CD giveaways at another show beforehand. You can also do this with digital dropcards or download codes.

3. Under Promise and Over Deliver

This can be said about many things in your professional and personal life. Do more than what you say you will do when you are pitching the show, and certainly not less. Most people talk about all of the great things they will do to make the show a hit and then they do half of them — bad business in general. Make a list of all of the things you told the venue you would do for the show as well as all of the things that were in the contract. Enter them on your calendar and make sure you do them…and do them on time. If the venue has to chase after you for stuff it will be a much less positive experience for them.

4. Be On Time

Show up for the soundcheck on time, start your show on time, end your show on time. Get your gear out of the venue on time. If for any reason something is going to run late or not go as planned, communicate with your venue contact as soon as you realize there’s an issue.

5. Deliver a Kick Ass Show NO MATTER WHAT

Even if you don’t get the audience you were hoping for, KICK ASS! Even if you are only performing for the staff and a handful of regulars, don’t show your discouragement. If you did not get the audience everyone hoped for, but your show was awesome they may give you another chance. If you don’t get the audience and you and your band mates act like a bunch of cry babies…your chances take a dive.

6. Be Friendly and Polite to EVERYONE

Treat everyone with respect — they’re all important. Just because you think your band is cool does not mean you are better or more important than the bouncers and servers. Don’t just kiss the booker’s ass. Be awesome to everyone.

In my gigging days I have always been nice to everyone in all of the venues I played. The booker often asks the staff what they think so you want everyone to report good news. Also, I have seen myself be in a town visiting or playing another venue with another band and then drop over to a venue to be greeted by a door person who lets me in for free and then have a server who gives me a free drink. Or even better, bouncers helping us carry our gear out at the end of the night!

7. Be Loyal To the Venue

Avoid playing another show just before or after in the same town or even a neighboring town without the venue’s consent. In fact, once you have a venue that works for you in a particular town or city, stick with that venue unless you outgrow it and need a larger venue or if the opportunity to start playing a better venue comes up.

When you do decide to move on, let the venue you were previously working with know. Write them an email or call them. Thank them for their support and let them know why you are moving on. If it’s that you need more capacity to satisfy your growing fan base, they will likely understand. If it’s because you are getting a better offer, at least give them the chance to counter it.

8. Tip the Service Staff

If the servers are running you drinks, bringing you food and helping you out, give them a tip at the end of the night. If you had a great night give them a good tip. In my experience this goes a long way. You will likely get better and faster service and they will be much more likely to say nice things about you and your band to senior management and venue patrons.

In Summary

Remember, venues are your clients so treat them with respect. If they like you musically and personally and you conduct business respectfully, they’ll likely give you more and treat you better. It’s a win-win scenario.

Marcato Festival CEO Darren Gallop has toured internationally with his bands and built the Marcato Musician platform to help artists and managers organize tours and create tour itineraries with ease. Learn more and try Marcato Musician free for 30 days at marcatomusician.com

KevinGet Venues to Ask You Back: 8 Tips You Can Use For Your Next Show
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Licensing Success in Seven Steps: Reverb Artist Shares her Secrets

NOTE: We’re proud to publish this guest column from long-term ReverbNation artist Cheryl B. Engelhardt. Not only is she sharing valuable information and excerpts from her e-course, “In The Key Of Success: The Five Week Jump-Start Strategy,” she’s also offering the whole course to fellow ReverbNation musicians at deep discount. Keep reading to find out more.

So you’ve made a record. Hopefully you’re starting to look at yourself like a business with a product to sell and money to make. Taking that product and using it as your source of income is key to achieving financial stability. Make your music work for you, and look for income opportunities that will create continuous streams of money, not just single payments.

As an artist, there are several ways to make money through your music, but these are the three you should be most concerned with:

1. Distributing and selling your music (CDs and digital sales)
2. Licensing your music and collecting sync fees and royalties (TV, film, commercial, online-videos, radio, in-store, and other placements)
3. Touring and collecting ticket sales (as well as merchandise and CD sales)

Personally, I add a fourth category that not all singer/songwriters are interested in pursuing:

4. Composing music (writing music for a specific project or media outlet).

“Passive income” is the term financial coaches and other moola-savvy folks use to describe the income that grows over time or continues to come in without you having to do any additional work. Sounds good, right? Royalties from a music placement in a TV show are one example. In fact, royalties are the best source of passive income a musician can hope for. Sure, you can sell CDs and tickets to shows and get some quick cash. But making the CD work long-term is the goal of licensing and publishing. Also, co-writing with others who will be selling their music, can be a fruitful source of passive income. One co-writing session and years of radio and sync fees could be headed your way. For now though, lets focus on licensing.

Understand what it’s all about

In a nutshell, the way music licensing works is you send your music to a publishing company, music library, or film / TV show itself for consideration. Make sure that your music is copyrighted and registered with a Performing Rights Organization (PRO) like ASCAP, BMI or SESAC.

It’s important to understand how you get paid from your music being placed in any form of media. From there, you can figure out which avenue you’d like to pursue. Figuring out all the different ways to get paid has taken me years. The main points to understand are:

  • The difference between publisher’s share and writer’s share
  • What master, mechanical, and sync licenses are referring to
  • Who pays what, and how you get your cash

There’s good five pages explaining each of the above in my E-course, so you can head there (discount code at the bottom!) to dig in deeper. Once you’ve understood the ways you get paid, you can move on to taking action to start making money!

1) Shake what yo mama gave you!

The first thing you can do is to use the resources you already have. I suggest making a list of the people, things, opportunities and skills you know you have. Once you see what you’ve already got, turn those into opportunities. For example, I had ReverbNation on my list under “websites I’m on.” This one item on my list turned into several thousands of dollars almost a year later. Here’s how: I saw that ReverbNation was offering a licensing program in conjunction with APM Music*. I submitted a song for free, and it was approved and become part of APM’s music library. Within two months of submitting, I was seeing it all over the ABC Family channel. A few months later, the same song was on “So You Think You Can Dance” (video below). These are media outlets I would not have otherwise had access to and came out of making one little list with “websites I’m on.”

2) Know your audience, and create opportunities for them

Get familiar with all the media outlets that could use music like yours. Watch TV shows that place songs in your genre. Look up the music supervisor. Do a search for publishing companies in your city and try to set up a face-to-face meeting to learn more about their operations and how you can help them out. (If you found a company that needs your kind of music, you’re providing them with the content they need and you are making your music more valuable!) Make your music an opportunity for them. 

3) Branch out

Look beyond TV shows and films to place your music. Develop relationships with online content creators. These folks are accessing a new niche of media that needs music. They will be the future viral video directors, TV writers, and film producers. While much of online video content production has smaller budgets and less chance of continued income, the opportunities in this arena are really limitless and may be worth your while to check out. Look into web series, viral YouTube videos, and animation sites.

Another place to look is independent films. If you are looking to break into the world of indie films, a great place to start is Craigslist. My sneaky and fun way of getting a few music placement and film composing gigs is looking up film auditions on Craigslist, going to the audition (no, I have never been cast… yet!), bringing up that I am interested in being involved with the film in their post- production process, and letting them know I can be a music resource. I usually get a call- back… and not for the part. (Note: If I ever am offered any part, I will take it. Do not waste these people’s time by showing up to an audition with no intention of taking a part. That would be super jerky of you.)

4) Get busy!

Figuring out where to send your music takes a bit of research and legwork. Get yourself organized in your research. Make a list of every TV show or film that you have seen (and ask some fans and friends to help you on this) where you have thought “Man! My song blahbitiboo would have been perfect in this.” Then look up that show on IMDB (The Internet Movie Database) or Google, and find the music producer or music supervisor. Look up their company. Their name and company and contact info goes on this list. I would contact them first to see if they accept unsolicited records. If they do, great! Head to the post office!

5) Create your mailing package

I strongly recommend sending a neat CD package of both the real CD (with all the vocal tracks) and a CD of the instrumental-only tracks. It’s been said that you increase your chance of placing your music by 50% if instrumental tracks are available. In fact, I would say that about half of my TV placements have been the music only, without the vocals. (Sometimes they may like the feel and energy of the track, but the lyrics don’t match the scene, or there may be a lot of dialogue so lyrics get in the way.)

6) Responsible follow-up

After you send the CDs, follow up within two weeks to make sure they got your package and have listened. If they think your entire record, or certain songs from your record could be a fit for their program, they will have you sign a “licensing deal.” This deal will allow them, the “Licensor” to use your music, sometimes exclusively, sometimes non-exclusively, for a period of time. This period can range from a year (with a big library like APM Music) to “in perpetuity,” a.k.a. forever (like with a publishing company such as Heavy Hitters Music). Some folks like to add a clause in the contract that if the track doesn’t make a certain amount of money in a certain amount of time, the track is yours to shop around again.

If that haven’t heard your package yet, ask them when they will be getting to it so you can follow up. Have the intention that they listen to your music. Don’t be desperate for them to want to sign you right now. Baby steps work, especially when you are committed every step of the way.

7) Submit to everything

I saw an opportunity on the ReverbNation site that called for a song for a Microsoft campaign. My first thought was “oh geez, everyone and their mother is going to submit to this, I’ll never get heard. Plus, I use a Mac.” But I submitted my tune anyway and ended up winning over $500 through the promotion. You never know what people will latch on to. (I mean, look up Boo The Dog on YouTube. Seriously?)

So that’s all for now. Take these steps and make them your own. Figure out your own systems and what works in your life. Once you’ve got your system in place, keep at it like your life depends on it. If you’re a full-time musician, it sort of does, right?

* ReverbNation and APM Music regularly invite new artists to participate in the Song Licensing Program. Invites are sent out to ReverbNation artists who are active users of the site, have complete profiles, and whose music fits what music supervisors are seeking. To learn more about the program, visit http://www.reverbnation.com/main/apm

Cheryl B. Engelhardt is a composer for films, ads and CollegeHumor.com, and a singer/songwriter who’s booked a bunch of tours around the USA and Europe and gotten her recorded music placed on TV shows. Her website is www.CBEmusic.com and she writes a music industry blog called Living On Gigging. You can follow her on Twitter @CBE.

 She just released “In The Key Of Success: The 5 Week Jump- Start Strategy,” an E-Course for independent musicians on how to jump-start their careers to radically change the results. If you liked this article, check out the rest of Cheryl’s E-course. She guarantees you will get results that you want, or your money back. And because you are a ReverbNation artist, you get a ridiculous 70% discount off the normal selling price by typing in REVERBN8TION when you go here: http://www.cbemusic.com/ecourse.

KevinLicensing Success in Seven Steps: Reverb Artist Shares her Secrets
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Electronica Producer Kastle Announces ReverbNation Winner for his Remix Contest

“It was great working with ReverbNation and reaching out to all of their artists. We had such a diverse selection of entries, thanks to all who entered and participated!” – Kastle

The backstory: ReverbNation, in partnership with label Seclusiasis, ran a dope remix challenge back in August.  Hundreds of contestants submitted their remix to Kastle’s track “I Know” for the chance to receive a single release on the label.
The man: San Francisco-based, DJ/producer Barrett Richards (aka Kastle) has cultivated his own style of bass-heavy beats with a soulful twist reminiscent of classic Chicago house. Although it’s too late to get in on this opportunity, it’s not too late to discover Kastle for yourself. Listen to his tracks here.
The track: Kastle’s “I Know” is stunning critics with its “pitched-up vocal stabs, floating electric pianos, wobbly bass, and jangly broken beats.”

 

And the winner is… inflect, a Nebraska producer who has shared the stage with such acts as The Glitch Mob, STS9, Bassnectar, Pretty Lights, EPROM, Nosaj Thing, Machinedrum, EOTO, Dubbel Dutch, Mux Mool, and many more.

Be the first to listen to inflect’s remix, which single release on Seclusiasis will be out next month:


ComScore

Here’s what the label had to say about inflect:
The one remix that stood out on top above the rest is by a young producer/DJ from Lincoln, Nebraska – inflect. In his thumping club ready remix, he takes the essence of the original song and twists it up with some techy sensibilities, giving it a new life while still maintaining a nod back to the Kastle original.
“So much dope stuff came through, but inflect’s joint stuck out as the one that bumped the most!” – Dev79, Seclusiasis co-owner
JUST IN! Seclusiasis has decided to add a twist to the competition.
In recognition of all the excellent remixes submitted, they’ve decided to make the release an EP and include three runners-up as well. On the “I Know” Remix EP set to drop in March on Seclusiasis, in addition to inflect’s remix they’ll also be including some heated reworks by Reverb artists, Krueger, +Verb and Direct Feed.”
 “We’re hype to have done this competition with ReverbNation and see so many people excited to submit their remixes.” – Starkey, Seclusiasis co-owner
Want to be part of next remix contest? Follow us on Twitter for updates on new opportunities!
KevinElectronica Producer Kastle Announces ReverbNation Winner for his Remix Contest
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Whoa! 136 more Reverb Bands Slated to Play SXSW… Are you one of them?

Wow, ReverbNation artists never cease to amaze us. Another 135 Reverb musicians and bands (bringing it to a total of almost 200!) were selected to play at SXSW 2012!

The SXSW crowd

If you haven’t seen the other 62 bands, you can check them out here.

Are you or someone you know on this list? Let us know (so we can meet and share a few beers at SXSW)!

1. Peter Bradley Adams
2. A.Dd+
3. ALO (Animal Liberation Orchestra)
4. Alpha Rev
5. Amoral
6. Ancestors
7. Ancient Astronauts
8. The Apache Relay
9. Arborea
10. Atash
11. Automelodi
12. Maya Azucena
13. Michael Beach
14. Bez
15. Bliss N Eso
16. Blitz the Ambassador
17. BoDeans
18. The Bombettes
19. Bonfire Nights
20. Cory Branan
21. Brother & Bones
22. Cairo Knife Fight
23. Candy
24. Canteca De Macao
25. Chapter 24
26. Clock Opera
27. Jordan Cook
28. The Copper Gamins
29. Cosmo Jarvis
30. Craft Spells
31. The Curious Mystery
32. Dash Rip Rock
33. Dead Letter Circus
34. The Defiled
35. Diplomats of Solid Sound
36. Dirty Karma
37. Dive
38. Lila Downs
39. Dry The River
40. Dying Fetus
41. Early Graves
42. Electric Guest
43. Elephant Stone
44. The Evaporators
45. The Foreign Resort
46. The Fray
47. Gamebouy
48. Gappy Ranks
49. Garland Jefferys
50. Gliss
51. Gold Fields
52. The Good Natured
53. Great Lake Swimmers
54. Peter Gregson
55. Hatcham Social
56. hellogoodbye
57. The Higher State
58. Audrey Horne
59. Horse Feathers
60. Hull
61. Anna Ihilis
62. Imaginary Cities
63. The Interbeing
64. Sarah Jaffe
65. Joe Volume
66. Kenny Ken
67. Kimbra
68. La-33
69. League of Extraordinary G’z
70. Li’l Cap’n Travis
71. LIRA
72. Little Hurricane
73. M.A.K.U. SoundSystem
74. Danny Malone
75. David Mayfield Parade
76. Andy McKee
77. MC lars
78. Mother Falcon
79. Krista Muir
80. My Jerusalem
81. Naeto C
82. Napoleon IIIrd
83. Natives
84. Natty
85. New Cassettes
86. Night Beats
87. Oh My Me
88. Lisa O’Neill
89. Paula and Karol
90. Protoje
91. Quiet Company
92. The Rasites
93. Nathaniel Rateliff
94. Res
95. The Riff Raff
96. Finn Riggins
97. The Ripe
98. Roach Gigz
99. Rachael Sage
100. Scale the Summit
101. Scars on 45
102. Schiller
103. Screaming Females
104. The Seedy Seeds
105. Shandy Mandies
106. Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds
107. Skindred
108. Frank Smith
109. Charlene Soraia
110. Sore
111. Soul Khan
112. Sparkadia
113. The Spinto Band
114. Spirits of the Dead
115. Spoek Mathambo
116. Stereo is a Lie
117. Patrick Sweany
118. Tall Ships
119. Tea Leaf Green
120. Telephunken
121. Torreblanca
122. Lissy Trullie
123. Tumi and the Volume
124. Turbina
125. 22
126. Two Cow Garage
127. Ume
128. The Violet May
129. Vockah Redu
130. Wheeler Brothers
131. The White Eyes
132. Witchburn
133. Carolyn Wonderland
134. Paul Woolford
135. Zorch

Honorary mention:

136. Mr. Bleat

KevinWhoa! 136 more Reverb Bands Slated to Play SXSW… Are you one of them?
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ReverbNation Gigs & Things

Every Monday we will post some information regarding the ReverbNation Opportunities we have brokered for our Artists.  These opportunities consist mostly of performance slots at Festivals, Conferences, Awards Shows, Tours, and Clubs but also include Songwriting Competitions, Licensing Opportunities, Music & Video Reviews, and more.

Since ReverbNation does not take a % of the Submission Fee that may be charged by some Promoters, we are often times able to offer Opportunities that have no Submission Fees or very discounted Submission Fees. Our goal is to keep providing value to the Artists, at the lowest cost possible!

Instead of spamming you with summary emails each week, just add the RSS feed in the upper right corner and you’ll be up to speed on all our opportunities. Feel free to share this blog post with your fellow artists!  And without further ado,

New Opportunity Listings:

Last Chance to Submit Opportunities:

And Always Available from ReverbNation:

The ReverbNation website now attracts 25 million visitors per month.  Get Featured on the Home Page at ReverbNation Featured Artist of the Week

Just a few of the Artists selected this week by our Promoters – BUT Congrats to All of You:

  • The ASPS were selected to have their record produced by Ron Nevison (producer/engineer whose credits include The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zeppelin, Kiss, Ozzy Osbourne, Bad Company, Barbra Streisand, Jefferson Starship, Chicago, Styx, Heart, Damn Yankees, Thin Lizzy and more.)
  • Dee-1 and BIGREC are two ReverbNation Artists that have been selected already to perform at this year’s A3C Hip Hop Festival.  Submissions are still open and at least 4 more ReverbNation slots are still available at A3C Hip Hop Festival.

Things to Know:

Submissions require a free ReverbNation account and active subscription to ReverbNation Press Kits.  If you do not have a ReverbNation Press Kit, activate your 30 day free trial now!

If you have an Opportunity(s) that is valuable to some or all of ReverbNation’s 1.4million artists, please go to http://www.reverbnation.com/controller/main/signup and choose Festival/Event. That will take you to the application, and after you fill it out, a rep will be in touch shortly!

If you are a Venue, please check out the only comprehensive Venue Application on Facebook, Venue Profile App on Facebook.  Any questions, give us a shout!

Thanks,

Lou Plaia & the RN Staff (no, its not a band name)

Lou PlaiaReverbNation Gigs & Things
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Vote for Your Favorite Band Names: A Look Back on 1,000,000 Artists

50 Popular Words That Bands Use In Their Names

ReverbNation.com reached a new milestone yesterday when it signed up its one millionth artist. “We’re humbled, but this is really a story about how vibrant the global Artist community is right now,” says COO and Co-Founder Jed Carlson. “For our part, we’ll continue doing what we do best – creating powerful tools and great opportunities for Artists and those the orbit them. ”

The 1,000,000th Artist to join the site is .. “PANA!“.  In celebration of this, we will be providing this Artist with a nice prize package, including a ‘1,000,000th Artist Reverb T-shirt’.

Launched in October of 2006, ReverbNation has quickly become one of the most explosive and talked about music sites on the Internet today. Artists all over the world are enjoying the site’s ever-expanding number of features and services, such as Digital Distribution to major online retailers, festival and showcase submission opportunities, and direct-to-fan merchandising. ReverbNation is growing faster by the day and Mike Doernberg, CEO and Co-Founder of the site, does not believe the momentum will be slowing any time soon. “We recognize that the music business is way more than just selling discs or downloads,” he says. “The scope of what we do for the Artist will continue to grow, and if we keep delivering real value to them, we expect that they will keep joining the Nation.”

Reaching one million artists could not have happened without the support of all of the amazing artists, venues, labels, and fans that have made ReverbNation what it is today. We would like to thank each and every one of you for all of your support through the years. Since the site’s birth, we have heard a lot of great music. We have also seen some of the most hilarious, interesting, (and sometimes just plain vulgar) band names ever created. In honor of reaching one million artists, we would like you to vote on your favorite band name in each of the following categories:

FUNNIEST – You WILL laugh.

MOST BIZARRE – Band names that MUST have an interesting backstory.

MOST CLEVER – Band names that we wish we would have thought of.

Be sure to vote for your favorites! The winning band in each category will receive a full year of our Reverb Press Kits service for FREE!

reverb_administratorVote for Your Favorite Band Names: A Look Back on 1,000,000 Artists
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Bands Helping Bands — Your Best Touring Advice

After much anticipation and competition, we’ve finally gotten our Bands Helping Bands finalists. There were a lot of great submissions, with a lot of great advice! We’ve placed some of our favorites below. Watch the videos and let us know your favorite one in the comments. The best one will get a Featured Artist spot on the ReverbNation homepage!

Zenith Da Goddess’ Tip — Keep Your Voice Healthy


Visit Zenith Da Goddess’ ReverbNation page

1000 Generations’ Tip — Offer Comment Cards At Gigs For Feedback

Visit 1000 Generations’ ReverbNation page

Jillian Riscoe’s Tip — Explore Unconventional Venues

Visit Jillian Riscoe’s ReverbNation page

Mike Borgia’s Tip — Show A Venue What Your Worth Is

Visit Mike Borgia’s ReverbNation page

Some Tips From A Venue Owner

Visit The Local 506’s ReverbNation page

reverb_administratorBands Helping Bands — Your Best Touring Advice
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