Gear Talk: Lauren Flax

As a talented DJ, songwriter, and producer Lauren Flax has worked with the likes of Sia, Le Tigre, Fischerspooner, and is part of the Brooklyn trip-hop duo, CREEP. With a single coming out with Fritz Pop Tv with remixes from The Carry Nation and Hannah Holland, an EP due out this summer, and a European summer tour, we chatted with Lauren about the equipment she takes on the road, what advice she’d give someone who wants to get into music production, and more.

Hey Lauren, stoked to have you be part of our series! Give us a little intro to Lauren FlaxHow has being a Detroit native and growing up in the Chicago house scene influenced your style?
Everything. It’s a pretty special thing to be surrounded by the best of the best in terms of house and techno. I grew up knowing the biggest influencers, and that definitely put a spark in my belly. I wanted to be a part of it.

KevinGear Talk: Lauren Flax
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Gear Talk: Carlson

Brooklyn-based producer/engineer Carlson has worked with dozens of popular artists including Cat Stevens, Autre Ne Veut, Tim Hecker, and Ariel Pink, and has been featured on NPR, Gorilla vs. Bear, and FACT. With his new LP Going South dropping on June 10, we chatted with him about about how he approaches producing, the piece of gear he can’t live without, and more.

How do you approach producing music?

For me the primary goal with all production is to take an artist’s vision and fuse it with the song at hand to create a story. Producing can mean so many different things these days. It can be an integral part of the songwriting process (as in making a beat, track or bed). It can involve a more traditional approach, with the producer playing the musical mentor (choosing instrumentation and arrangements, choosing the right takes and giving musical direction.) Sometimes it’s more of an anchor role; With large groups or even smaller groups of people, it’s not uncommon to need a studio time/space manager, making sure everyone is focused on the task at hand and aware of the common goal. Other times it can be the opposite; A very hands off job. Perhaps the artist(s) are too organized and too inside their own heads to let loose and let the emotion of the music take over.

There’s so many different roles to take on it can be hard to peg down till you’re actually in the studio making music, but once i’m in the process of making a record it becomes clear what’s needed.

KevinGear Talk: Carlson
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