4 Ways to Tell If Your Mix Is Too Busy (and How to Fix It)

The art of mixing in many ways is an art of balancing — you’re weighing different frequencies, audio levels, sound placements, etc. Many times when trying to balance too many things at once, things begin to fall apart. If your mix is too busy and crowded with clashing frequencies and harsh-sounding audio clips, you’ll need to clean it up before releasing the music. So, before you give the greenlight to a mix that’s on the border of being too busy, give it a few tests. We’ve outlined four ways to tell if your mix is too busy, and in each way, we offer a solution.

Rebecca4 Ways to Tell If Your Mix Is Too Busy (and How to Fix It)
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How To Develop a Positive Songwriting Atmosphere

Whether you’re completely new to songwriting or have been making music for years, working in a space that’s conducive for creativity is essential if you’re taking your craft seriously. But musicians often have a bad reputation for not taking care of themselves, and sometimes this neglect can seep its way into the songwriting process and stifle the atmosphere that surrounds the unique way we write songs. Are you one of those people with the uncanny ability to work creatively in any space? Well, that’s awesome, but the rest of us will have to invest thought and energy into creating a comfortable space to make music in.

RebeccaHow To Develop a Positive Songwriting Atmosphere
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7 Ways to Make a Sample Completely Your Own

Some of the greatest sample-based production has featured clear and upfront use of other samples. On the other hand, turning a sample into your own unique piece of music is a creative way to put your personal touch on a piece of sample-based production.

If you’re having trouble using samples because you don’t want the original song to be so present, we’ve outlined seven ways to make a sample completely your own.

But before you master the art of sampling, know that even if the sample you use is unrecognizable from the original sample, you should always ensure you have all appropriate licenses and clearances from the original creator, even if you give your music out for free. And your incorporation of samples in to material which you display on the ReverbNation site is subject to our Terms and Conditions.

Rebecca7 Ways to Make a Sample Completely Your Own
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5 Ways to Blend Acoustic Drums With Electronic Drums

Electronic drums have become the new standard for most popular genres of music, from hip-hop to pop to EDM. Several of the world’s biggest artists go on tour without a drummer — something unimaginable just a few decades ago. Drums are still an integral part of popular music, but instead of an actual drummer on an acoustic kit pounding out the beats, it’s usually a producer hunched over a laptop.

However, that doesn’t mean acoustic drums don’t have a place in modern music. Obviously genres like rock and country still use drummers. But for producers that are used to working with 808s and digitally-created percussion, there are plenty of benefits of blending acoustic drums with electronic drums. Though, it’s important to make sure blending the two is done smoothly. Otherwise, the contrast can be overbearing, sloppy, and inorganic. Here are five ways to blend the two:

Rebecca5 Ways to Blend Acoustic Drums With Electronic Drums
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How to Tame Unwanted Low Frequencies Out Of Your Mix

One of the most essential mixing tips when working with low frequencies is to exercise the “less is more” approach. These days, low frequencies are more pronounced than ever in popular music, with hip-hop and EDM-inflected pop dominating the charts. But in order for the low frequencies you want to shine, you need to tame the ones you don’t want. The human ear can only hear so many frequencies, but luckily, digital audio workstations give us helpful tools like EQ spectrums so we can see where our audio is landing on the frequency scale.

A beefy 808 should be most pronounced below 200Hz — whereas a hi-hat really has no good reason to have frequencies in that below 200Hz area. No one is listening to a hi-hat for the low-end, just like no one is listening to an 808 for frequencies above 10,000Hz. When the two start to get in each other’s lanes, the mix can start to mud and feel cluttered. But it doesn’t have to be that way. A smart producer and/or mixer will know to tame unwanted low frequencies in instruments that don’t call for a pronounced low end, such as most hi-hats. So, let’s get into the weeds about when and why you should tame those unwanted low frequencies.

RebeccaHow to Tame Unwanted Low Frequencies Out Of Your Mix
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How To Break Out of Your Songwriting Rut

If you’re a serious songwriter, you’re probably used to wrestling with the beasts of routine and boredom every so often. Even songwriters brimming with talent and promise have fruitless writing sessions sometimes. It’s all part of the process. But when a songwriter experiences weeks, months or even years of uninspired frustration with their work, it’s an entirely different story. If this sounds like you, I’ve got some practical guidance that can help break you out of your songwriting rut.

KrissyHow To Break Out of Your Songwriting Rut
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The ReverbNation Guide to Music Theory: Part 2

This is the second half of a special Reverb Nation Guide To Music Theory. In Part 1, I taught you how to build and understand intervals and basic chords. If you haven’t gone through Part 1 one of this guide, stop reading this and check that out first. To understand everything in this article, you’ll need to have a basic knowledge of everything I talked about in that first guide.

In this article, I’ll introduce you to scales, Roman numeral analysis, and the circle of 5ths. Having a solid grasp on music theory’s basic concepts can be a huge help to you no matter what your unique experience and background in music is, and by the end of this guide you should have more than enough information to be able to wrap your head around the ideas that govern music. Let’s jump back in.

JoyThe ReverbNation Guide to Music Theory: Part 2
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3 Songwriting Partnership Lessons From Lennon and McCartney

Arguably the most prolific pop songwriting duo of the 20th century, John Lennon and Paul McCartney crafted some of the best known and most beloved tracks of all time as the major powerhouses behind the Beatles. Although each would go onto have successful solo careers — McCartney with Wings in the ‘70s and largely by himself thereafter and Lennon, along with wife Yoko Ono, helming politically charged outfits during his tragically short post-Beatles career — many insist they were never as good apart as they were together.

When boiled down to the basic status of “co-writers,” however, Lennon and McCartney aren’t so different from you and your writing partners. They dealt with many similar issues that, hopefully, won’t crop up too often in your own career, including copyright disputes, claims over who wrote what, and the public deifying one half over the other. It’s indisputable, however, that their combined power created a musical benchmark few other have risen to.

Although there are many, many lessons to learn from Lennon and McCartney’s songwriting partnership, here are three key takeaways that will get you and your present and future co-writers on the right track to crafting musical masterpieces.

Tyler3 Songwriting Partnership Lessons From Lennon and McCartney
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